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How to Protect Newborns in Cold Weather

The winter months are coming, and you may be wondering how to protect your newborn in cold weather. How can you keep them.
How to Protect Newborns in Cold Weather

The winter months are coming, and you may be wondering how to protect your newborn in cold weather. How can you keep them warm but still allow them to breathe correctly?

How should they dress for the season? Parents must take care of their children, no matter what their age. Here are some tips on how to protect your newborn in cold weather!

– How to dress your newborn in cold weather

– How to keep them warm without overheating them

– How to allow their breathing unimpeded with a scarf or other article of clothing that covers the nose and mouth. If you don’t have one, use a blanket instead! This is because scarves can cover too much airflow.

It’s also important not to place hats on infants’ heads before they are six months old since it isn’t necessary for warmth until then. Hats should be used only when babies need protection from the sun, which usually starts around age three weeks.

Headbands are an alternative if you want something covering the forehead but still allowing airflow and blocking eyesight!

Dress your baby in layers

“If you are comfortable with a jacket on top of your clothes, you should have your baby in a jacket or snowsuit and a blanket,” says Molly Broder, M.D., a pediatrician at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York.

Dressing your infant in layers allows you to adjust to her needs. “The bottom layer can be snugs, like leggings and a bodysuit. On top of that, you can put another layer of pants and a long sleeve shirt. Finish up with a jacket, hat, mittens, and warm booties to keep hands and feet warm,” says Dr. Broder. Choose breathable fabrics such as cotton and muslin so you can take clothes on and off as needed.

Ditch the coat in the car

Taking off your baby’s coat in the car may seem counterintuitive. But the problem with that cute puffy coat is if there’s too much material between the baby and the car seat straps, the material could compress during an accident, leaving space for your baby to become unsecured.

“Coats are unsafe because you need to loosen the car seat harness to accommodate them, but in a crash, they can compress, leaving a big gap between the harness and child, upping her chance of injury,” explains Rallied McAllister, M.D., of Lexington, Kentucky, coauthor of The Mommy M.D. Guide to Your Baby’s First Year.

“We’re trying to find a happy medium of keeping the baby warm while still being safe,” says Dr. McAllister. “It’s not beneficial for babies when they overheat.

” As such, you should dress your child in layers that can be peeled off with ease during car rides-think long johns and leggings under tights or jeans, followed by an outer layer like a coat or snowsuit (investing in some slimmer fitting ones may make things easier).

Don’t forget accessories! Hats are good because infants’ heads are one of their only sources of heat loss; if there is no hat available at the moment, use blankets instead as scarves could cover too much airflow. And lastly, keep the headband to protect the forehead but still allow airflow and won’t block eyesight!

Bundle up for a tour outside.

If the temperature or wind chill dips below freezing, or if nonfreezing temperatures are mixed with wind or rain, keep your little one inside except for brief excursions, like to and from the car. If it’s not arctic outdoors, dress him in a winter jacket, a hat that covers his ears, mittens, and a stroller blanket or bunting.

“Check your baby often for signs of discomfort. If his face gets red, his skin is warm, and he’s fussy, he’s probably overheated. If he’s fussy and teary-eyed, and his skin is cold to the touch, he’s probably not bundled up enough,” says Dr. McAllister.

Wear your baby for warmth

Carriers are a great way to use your body heat to provide extra coziness for the baby in the cold weather—but then he probably doesn’t need that extra sweater. Even so, “always keep their head and feet covered as that is how they lose heat,” says Dr. Montague.

As always, when you’re wearing your baby, make sure his face is not pressed against your chest or clothing (especially when you’re donning a winter jacket) to keep his airway free. “And be careful of ice and slipping and falling yourself,” adds Dr. Montague.

Be careful when covering your baby’s stroller

In an abundance of caution, you might want to throw a blanket over your baby’s stroller or protect it with those old-fashioned plastic covers. But Dr. Montague warns that this could compromise the airflow to your baby inside.

“Many strollers have covers especially fitted to that brand to allow appropriate air circulation,” suggests Dr. Broder. “Otherwise, put your baby in a jacket, hat, mittens, and booties, and then tuck her under a blanket to chest level to keep her warm and snuggly in the stroller.” If you can, try to walk against the wind.

Keep the indoor temperature right

You may be worried about the baby being too cold, but too much indoor heat can also be a problem. “Indoor heating has low humidity, and it’s that lack of moisture in the air that can dry your baby’s delicate skin,” says Dr. Puttgen.

“To avoid that, keep your indoor temperature as cool as you can tolerate during the day—anywhere between 68°F and 72°F.” When your little one is sleeping, however, you should set the thermostat lower, to between 65°F and 68°F, which will not only benefit her skin but can reduce her risk of SIDS, research shows. Dress your baby in a sleeper and sleep sack—a wearable blanket—to keep her warm enough.

Prevent dry skin

“Cold temperatures, the lack of humidity, and recirculated air can all contribute to dry, itchy, scaly skin,” says Dr. Swanson. Ironically, water can dry out skin, and most babies don’t need to be washed daily in the winter anyway.

Use warm water (not hot), and don’t let your baby soak too long—although baths are an excellent way to warm up. “A baby’s skin should still be slightly damp after his bath,” says Dr. Swanson, who also recommends using lotion or cream afterward to nourish and protect the skin.

How to Protect Newborns in Cold Weather: How To Keep Your Baby Warm When The Temperature Drops was last modified: by ***Bundle up for a tour outside!

If the temperature or wind chill dips below freezing, or if nonfreezing temperatures are mixed with wind or rain, keep your little one inside except for brief excursions, like to and from the car. If it’s not arctic outdoors, dress him in a winter jacket, a hat that covers his ears, mittens, and a scarf.

Watch out for warning signs

If your baby starts shivering, or his extremities—hands, feet, and face—are cold and red, he may be getting too cold.

If your baby’s lips, ears, or fingers turn blue from the cold, it could mean that his heart has stopped pumping blood effectively and is no longer providing warm body fluids to these areas. Call 911 immediately if you see these signs!

If a little one starts shivering uncontrollably while wearing lightweight clothing in temperatures below 40 degrees F, take him indoors immediately and change out of his wet clothes as soon as possible.

Start with the following sentence: How to Protect Newborns in Cold Weather Different seasons can mean different, and sometimes extreme, weather conditions for your little one. With winter here, it’s essential to know how to protect newborns from cold temperatures.

Bundle up for a tour outside! If the temperature or wind chill dips below freezing, or if nonfreezing temperatures are mixed with wind or rain, keep your little one inside except for brief excursions (to and from the car).

But what do you do if they’re getting too cold? Watch out for warning signs like shivering! If your baby starts shivering uncontrollably while wearing lightweight clothing in temps below 40 degrees F (or is shaking at any temp), take him indoors immediately and change out of his wet clothes as soon as possible.

Bundle up for a tour outside! If the temperature or wind chill dips below freezing, or if nonfreezing temperatures are mixed with wind or rain, keep your little one inside except for brief excursions (to and from the car).

But what do you do if they’re getting too cold? Watch out for warning signs like shivering! If your baby starts shivering uncontrollably while wearing lightweight clothing in temps below 40 degrees F (or is shaking at any temp), take him indoors immediately and change out of his wet clothes as soon as possible.

How to Protect Newborns in Cold Weather Different seasons can mean different, and sometimes extreme, weather conditions for your little one. With winter here, it’s essential to know how to protect newborns from cold temperatures.

Bundle up for a tour outside! If the temperature or wind chill dips below freezing, or if nonfreezing temperatures are mixed with wind or rain, keep your little one inside except for brief excursions (to and from the car).

But what do you do if they’re getting too cold? Watch out for warning signs like shivering! If your baby starts shivering uncontrollably while wearing lightweight clothing in temps below 40 degrees F (or is shaking at any temp), take him indoors immediately and change out of his wet clothes as soon as possible. How to Protect Newborns in Cold Weather Different seasons can mean different.

Conclusion:

How to Protect Newborns in Cold Weather How to Protect Newborns in Cold Weather Different seasons can mean different, and sometimes extreme, weather conditions for your little one. With winter here, it’s essential to know how to protect newborns from cold temperatures.

Bundle up for a tour outside! If the temperature or wind chill dips below freezing, keep your little one inside except for brief excursions (to and from the car). But what do you do if they’re getting too cold? Watch out for warning signs like shivering!

If your baby starts shivering uncontrollably while wearing lightweight clothing in temps below 40 degrees F (or is shaking at any temp), take him indoors immediately and change out of his wet clothes as soon as possible.

How to Protect Newborns in Cold Weather Different seasons can mean different, and sometimes extreme, weather conditions for your little one. With winter here, it’s essential to know how to protect newborns from cold temperatures.

Bundle up for a tour outside! If the temperature or wind chill dips below freezing, keep your little one inside except for brief excursions (to and from the car). But what do you do if they’re getting too cold? Watch out for warning signs like shivering!

If your baby starts shivering uncontrollably while wearing lightweight clothing in temps below 40 degrees F (or is shaking at any temp), take him indoors immediately and change out of his wet clothes as soon as possible.